Munchen-Gladbach, Germany: Spring 1945

Posted: September 24, 2013 in Uncategorized

The unit may have stayed in Heerlen until perhaps February 1945. By early spring, they had moved a little farther east, across the German border, to Munchen-Gladbach (known today as Monchengladbach). The picture of John Andrews and Bill Johnson,below, was their way of celebrating that they had made it into Germany without being injured. David Andrews wrote about this photo: “This one is priceless! It looks like they single-handedly won the war!

John Andrews and Dad celebrate arriving in Germany alive!

John Andrews and Dad celebrate arriving in Germany alive!

"Our home in Munchen-Gladback, Germany"

“Our home in Munchen-Gladbach, Germany”

img047  Edward Johnson

John Andrews and Dad

John Andrews and Dad

George Legg and his D-Day beard, Munchen-Gladbach, Germany

George Legg and his D-Day beard, Munchen-Gladbach, Germany

Lieutenants Brooks, Errington, and Kent in a captured enemy trailer converted to mobile quarters

Lieutenants Brooks, Errington, and Kent in a captured enemy trailer converted to mobile quarters

Frank Gomez; his mother promised 13 quarts of habenero sauce ready to celebrate with on the unit's return home

Frank Gomez; his mother promised 13 quarts of habenero sauce ready to celebrate with on the unit’s return home

The 111th crosses the Rhine near Krefeld, Germany

The 111th crosses the Rhine near Krefeld, Germany

Haff and Johnson crosing the Rhine

Haff and Johnson crossing the Rhine

First stopping place after crossing the Rhine

First stopping place after crossing the Rhine

On VE Day, May 8, 1945, the men celebrated the end of the war in Europe in many interesting ways.

 Celebrating VE Day, May 8, 1945, somewhere in Germany

Celebrating VE Day, May 8, 1945, in Salzwedel, northern Germany, near the Elbe River

The unit continued duty in northern Germany,  based in Brake, on the Weser River near Bremen. They spent the summer there, with all of the men gone by October and shipped home.

Prisoners from the Elbe being processed, northern Germany

Prisoners from the Elbe being processed, northern Germany

Dad was able to take leave to go back to Britain for his wedding in late August; when he returned in early October–nice honeymoon, Dad!– he discovered his unit had been shipped home without him. He hooked up with another unit, which didn’t get shipped back to the States until that fall. He and his adopted unit left for their hometowns from New York in October.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Andy Philpin says:

    Hi Andrea, this is a fantastic record of the war from a personal perspective. Brilliant to have so many photos. I lived in Monchengladbach myself for about 18 months – a bit different then!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s