The Places: Photos

Destroyed US tanks near Bastogne, Ardennes, July 1944

Destroyed US tanks near Bastogne, Ardennes, July 1944

Bridge in Llanelli, south Wales, 1943

Bridge in Llanelli, south Wales, 1943

Eden Roc Club, France, Sept. 1945

Eden Roc Club, France, Sept. 1945

Cherbourg, France, 1944

Cherbourg, France, 1944

Falaise Gap, Normandy, after the battle, Aug. 1944

Falaise Gap, Normandy, after the battle, Aug. 1944

Army tanks in Neath, Wales, 1943

Army tanks in Neath, Wales, 1943

Le Havre, France, leaving for home

Le Havre, France, leaving for home

Dortmund, Germany, May 1945

Dortmund, Germany, May 1945

111th trucks in Barry, wales, late 1943

111th trucks in Barry, wales, late 1943

St Dogmaels, Wales

St Dogmaels, Wales

Playing ball on Poppit Sands, near St Dogmaels, Wales, 1944

Playing ball on Poppit Sands, near St Dogmaels, Wales, 1944

Rear view, Albro Castle, Wales, 1944

Rear view, Albro Castle, Wales, 1944

Possibly the lane up to Albro Castle, St Dogmaels, Wales, 1944

Possibly the lane up to Albro Castle, St Dogmaels, Wales, 1944

Waiting for the train, Aberdeen, MD, 1942

Waiting for the train, Aberdeen, MD, 1942

Bridge in Llanelli, south Wales, 1943

Bridge in Llanelli, south Wales, 1943

Albro Castle, Wales, 1944

Albro Castle, Wales, 1944

Albro Castle courtyard

Albro Castle courtyard

Albro Castle chimneys

Albro Castle chimneys

Bremer Voll Kammerai plant, Blumenthal, Germany, on the Weser River

Bremer Voll Kammerai plant, Blumenthal, Germany, on the Weser River

We are still trying to find out all the places the men were during the war. It seems some men got to go to places like Marseilles, France, while others were sent into the Battle of the Bulge! At different times, of course. As we learn more, we will update this page. Any help will be appreciated, and contributions are welcome as we piece together the puzzle.

Reichelsheim, Germany train station 1945

Reichelsheim, Germany train station 1945

Bus used to carry German soldiers, now kaput, France

Bus used to carry German soldiers, now kaput, France

8 inch railway gun, they really roar when they go off

8 inch railway gun, they really roar when they go off

Street Scene, Munchen-Gladbach Germany, 1945

Street Scene, Munchen-Gladbach Germany, early 1945

Farmer getting in the way in France

Farmer getting in the way in France

German wrecked tanks in Falaise Gap FR

German wrecked tanks in Falaise Gap France, August 1944

Albro Castle, St. Dogmaels Wales

Albro Castle, St. Dogmaels Wales, 1944

Artillery Section, L Charlie Whisenhunt, Bohunk (Joe Sed), Leo Schenkier

Artillery Section, L Charlie Whisenhunt, Bohunk (Joe Sedlacek), Leo Schenkier

John Raisler crawling into ME109. Salzwedel Airport GE around V-E Day

John Raisler crawling into ME109. Salzwedel Airport GE around V-E Day

Half track combat vehicle with 75 mm howitzer. That is a 155mm howitzer in front of it.

Half track combat vehicle with 75 mm howitzer. That is a 155mm howitzer in front of it.

105 Howitzer torn down - guys from the section

105 Howitzer torn down – guys from the section

Chow break in Belgium

Chow break in Belgium

Going home. sign at port in Le Havre, France

Going home. sign at port in Le Havre, France, Oct. 1945

Going home, convoy break on way to port

Going home, convoy break on way to port

ruined Hotel de France

ruined Hotel de France

girl and bombed tank more bombed buildings maybe France two men jeeps Heerlen ruined town trucks parked listening to a performance in the field more ruins

Paris, August 1944

Paris, August 1944

Heerlen, Holland, probably

Heerlen, Holland, probably

picnic maybe Normandy with French girl

Picnic in Normandy with Red Cross girls

finding a wreck howitzer towing Germany or Holland

Heerlen, Holland

Heerlen, Holland

more damage inspection is this Lt. Witt

Lt. Witt inspects damage

Watching a show, Normandy?

Watching a show, Normandy?

on convoy men with equipment on platform

Covering trucks with cam netting, probably Normandy

Covering trucks with cam netting, probably Normandy

another Paris shot

Ruins in Normandy?

Munchen-Gladbach, Germany, early 1945

two soldiers and artillery working on 105mm Howitzer at Munchen-Gladbach, Germany

roland stuttgart

Roland Unangst took this photo of a bombed Stuttgart, Germany, in 1945.

roland castle roland garage area germany working in the shop 111th camp at Brake maybe flatbed truck on tow parked convoy their home in northern Germany boxcar with place names boxcars at railway station waiting city river dock better boxcar with Marseille sign again destroyed city scene houses along river place unknown interesting stone cliff more destroyed city r voire and car maybe France fctory scene of mountains 572 Batallion German or French house tile roof train 7th army recreation hotel roland looking down on bridge and town Mannheim sign roland german town maybe Brake roland truck convoy

Roland Unangst probably Albro Castle, wales

Roland Unangst probably Albro Castle, Wales

Marseilles France waiting for boat to bring them home to USA campbell

Marseilles, France, waiting for boat to bring them home to USA

Mailed Oct 22, 1945 from Bavaria J

Mailed Oct 22, 1945 from Bavaria

city scene germany possibly campbell

German city?

Taken in Brake, Germany. Statue from first World War

Taken in Brake, Germany. Statue from first World War

Red Cross Club, Brake, Germany Campbell

Red Cross Club, Brake, Germany

Our castle home campbell

Our castle home, location unknown

"Inside our automotive shop," wrote Unangst

“Inside our automotive shop,” wrote Unangst

German children, after receiving candy treats from the men

German children, after receiving candy treats from the men

This is a picture of our apartment taken while the Germans were in full swing. I found it   Campbell.

Roland Unangst wrote, “This is a picture of our apartment taken while the Germans were in full swing. I found it in the room here.”

Taken on the inside of a German Liberty Ship

jeep on crane campbell

Jeep on crane, location unknown

Possibly Wales?

Possibly Wales?

Wales April 1944

Wales April 1944

Image (6)

???

Image (4) Image (5)

German Liberty ship

German Liberty ship

???

???

August 1945, Germany

August 1945, Germany

Weser River, Brake, Germany

Weser River, Brake, Germany

Unangst wrote, " House on left is where we are now located, Oct 1945"

Unangst wrote, ” House on left is where we are now located, Oct 1945″

unknown town campbell

Unknown town

Curtis Vosz, in Bremen, Germany?

Curtis Vosz, in Brake, Bremen, Germany?

Falaise Gap, Normandy, in August 1944, a few days after the battle there

Falaise Gap, Normandy, in August 1944, a few days after the battle there

mom's list

Paris, Liberation Day, 1944

img210 Our home at Munchen Gladbach, Germany, Spring 1945

Dad wrote, “Our home at Munchen Gladbach, Germany, Spring 1945.”

img153 Main entrance to Fort Eban Emmanuel, Belgium

Main entrance to Fort Eban Emael, Belgium

img182 Near Sittard, Holland

Near Sittard, Holland

 Blown bridge in Maastricht, Holland

Blown bridge in Maastricht, Holland

20131025-151929.jpg

German soccer stadium today, on site of the 111th’s quarters in Munchengladbach, Germany, 1945

Albro Castle, St. Dogmael's, Wales

Albro Castle, St. Dogmael’s, Wales

Munchen-Gladbach, Germany, spring 1945

Munchen-Gladbach, Germany, spring 1945

img226 Small arms set up in Muchen Gladbach, Germany

Small arms set up in Munchen Gladbach, Germany

Shop area, Heerlen, 1945

Shop area, Heerlen, 1945

The Reich-Berlin autobahn

The Reich-Berlin autobahn

First stopping place after crossing the Rhine

First stopping place after crossing the Rhine–a church?

Haff and Johnson crossing the Rhine

Haff and Johnson crossing the Rhine

U.S. Base G-40, on the docks at Sully, Wales

U.S. Base G-40, on the docks at Sully, Wales

edited Rifle practice near Mwnt, Wales, June 6, 1944

Rifle practice near Mwnt, Wales, June 6, 1944

Albro Castle: John and Harold's building

Albro Castle, Wales, June 6, 2013

Omaha Beach, D+5, when the 111th Ordnance arrived.

Omaha Beach, D+5, when the 111th Ordnance arrived.

Cherbourg, the day of the 3,000-plane raid for the st. Lo breakthrough, July 25, 1944

Cherbourg, the day of the 3,000-plane raid for the st. Lo breakthrough, July 25, 1944

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Comments
  1. Terry Cross says:

    Andrea,
    Again I am overwhelmed by the recent addition of these pictures. My father, Ray Cross, is 94 and was in the111th a few months before D-Day through the end of the war. I was able to visit him over Christmas and share all these photos and especially the stories from the men. I have heard so many stories that dad never shared before–all because these photos triggered some long-held memories. Thanks to you and all the others for sharing.

    While many of the men were with the 111th Ordnance from Texas, my father was stationed in Iceland for almost 2 years with the 66th Ordnance. That group (the 66th) met for years in PA or OH and so dad went to their reunions, but didn’t have the money to make it to Texas for those reunions. Dad came from Iceland to St. Dogmels (Wales) and joined the 111th there.

    Dad was in the automotive section, repairing jeeps and light trucks. He was over 3 or 4 other men (he was a T-3, I think–equivalent to a staff sergeant with a “T” inside it). I will try to write down some of the stories and the men he knew. Unfortunately, it appears that your father and a number of men in the pictures were in the small-arms repair unit, which Dad said was in the same general area but the men usually didn’t cross paths that much. So, he’s not in the photos but he does recognize a number of folks, including the captain, the lieutenant, and especially Sergeant Gomez. He kept telling me that Gomez was a wonderful man and a master sergeant. I told him that I really doubted he was that high in rank and then the next picture proved me wrong! There he was in all his stripes!

    One of the photos the men sent was of a tank sitting by the side of a road. Dad remembers that very well. He thinks it was somewhere in Belgium (his memory was Liege, but I think the photo had a different label). Its gun seems to be sagging, but the German tank is actually unharmed. It simply ran out of gas. The German operator was 1/2 mile from the largest fuel depot in Belgium or Holland at that time (Dad described it as having barrells and barrells of gasoline) and if he had made it there he could have blown things sky high–and had more petrol to boot!

    For years I tried to get Dad to retrace his route through France, Belgium, and Holland and into Germany, but regardless of both of our efforts, we simply could not figure it out. Dad especially had trouble remembering the name of the little town in Holland quite close to the German border. We were thrilled when Heerlen appeared on some of the stories and photos since that was the very place Dad couldn’t recall! He said the German liked to lob artillery shells into the town and sometimes quite near their outpost. There was an old factory or mine (seems like he thought it was a glass factory, but I may be confusing my stories) that the men would sometimes use to take showers since there was still hot water and showers there. Dad said one of his most vivid memories (and he can’t tell it without bending over in laughter) was when the German lobbed a shell that hit the mine/factory and especially struck the hot steam lines. There was a sergeant from their unit in there (I think his name was Hamburg) who was taking a shower. Dad said he ran out of there across the street 90 mph and buck naked! They laughed about that for weeks, he said. I suppose the laughter was okay since the sergeant was uninjured.

    Well, I’ll share more later. Thanks again for helping me to learn more about Dad’s life and the guys he spent these years with.
    Terry Cross

  2. Lyndon says:

    the photo of the amphibious vehicles in Neath South Wales, just wondering if the location is definitely Neath?

    • Andrea says:

      The photograph you refer to, which belonged to 111th member Gene Karl, had writing on the back that said “Neath.” Other than that, we don’t know for sure.

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